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Electronics 390-ERS-2ELE
Laboratorium (LAB) Rok akademicki 2020/21

Informacje o zajęciach (wspólne dla wszystkich grup)

Liczba godzin: 45
Limit miejsc: (brak limitu)
Zaliczenie: Zaliczenie na ocenę
Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

1. Manual for labs in library of Faculty of Physics U of B (in Polish only)

2. Agarwal, Anant, and Jeffrey H. Lang. Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits. San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Elsevier, July 2005. ISBN: 9781558607354.

3. Yang E.S. – Microelectronic devices – McGraw Hill 1988

4. Neamen D.A. – Semiconductor Physic and Devices 3rd ed. – Mc Graw Hill 2002

5. Sze S.M. – Semiconductor Devices: physics and technology, 2nd Edition – Wiley 2002

6. B. Razavi Fundamentals of Microelectronics, Willey, 2008

7. A. Sedra, K.C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, Oxford UP 2010

8. R. Jaeger, T. Blalock, Microelectronic Circuit Design,McGraw Hill 2003

Efekty uczenia się: (tylko po angielsku)

After successfully studying course of Electronics students will be able to:

1. Understand the basic electrical engineering principles and abstractions on which the design of electronic systems is based. These include lumped circuit models, digital circuits, and operational amplifiers;

2. Understand the physical bases of solid state electronics;

3. Build circuits and take measurements of circuit variables using tools such as oscilloscopes, multimeters, and signal generators. Compare the measurements with the behavior predicted by mathematic models and explain the discrepancies;

4. Analyze problems in the field of basic electronics and find their solutions, analyze and formulate conclusions;

5. Use literature and Internet resources to understanding and solving the problems of electronics;

6. Use teamwork skills laboratory, assuming the role of the leader or the coordinator of the experiment;

7. Organize a work and take responsibility for results of his work;

8. Appreciate the practical significance of the systems developed in the course.

Metody i kryteria oceniania: (tylko po angielsku)

To gets assessment of laboratory necessary is to answer on entrance test, execute all of labs, to prepare reports and answer for question (from list enclosed to syllabusse) connected with received results . The absence of 50% of the laboratory makes it impossible to obtain credit from the laboratory.

The assessment of labs is necessary condition to oral assessment of lecture.

Evaluation of student work:

• assessment of labs.

Questions to pass the Electronics Lab Exercises

Exercise 1

1. What will change if you apply an AC sine wave with a constant value of amplitude and frequency, e.g. to a low-pass passive filter? Explain the changes.

2. What will change if you apply an AC square wave with a constant value of amplitude and frequency e.g. to a low-pass passive filter? Explain the changes.

3. Plot the magnitude (voltage gain) vs frequency of the low-pass filter and explain the changes.

4. Plot the phase shifting vs frequency of the low-pass filter and explain the changes.

5. How does the time constant value have an influence on the square wave in a low-pass, high-pass filter? Explain.

Exercise 2

1. Compare the voltage gain value of the CE and CC amplifiers. Explain such different values.

2. Compare the current gain value of the CE and CC amplifier. Explain such different values.

3. What is a transistor's operating point and how can it be set up?

4. Explain why in a used circuit the input resistance value of the transistor is equal to the value of the RB resistor.

5. Explain which of the measured CE and CC amplifiers is better for conventional applications.

Exercise 3-4

1. Discuss the obtained voltage gain values for inverting an OpAmp configuration. Explain the discrepancy between real and ideal amplifiers.

2. Discuss the obtained voltage gain values for a non-inverting OpAmp configuration. Explain the discrepancy between real and ideal amplifiers.

3. Discuss the obtained voltage gain values for summing and differential OpAmp configurations. Explain the discrepancy between real and ideal amplifiers.

4. In a used circuit, to measure the offset voltage and polarizing currents you could change the value of the resistor. Which value of resistor "better" compensates the offset voltage? Explain why.

5. Why do the Uomin and Uomax values of the comparator without hysteresis used in the lab exercise have values equal ± 11V?

6. Prove that in a comparator with hysteresis the hysteresis loop value should equal about 4V.

7. How does the value of the resistor in the negative feedback loop of the multivibrator have an influence on the frequency of the generated wave? Explain.

8. Discuss the magnitude (voltage gain) vs frequency of the active band-pass filter; compare the obtained experimental and theoretical results.

Exercise 5

1. How is a regulated linear power supply built? How do DC and ripple voltages change at selected measuring points?

2. How do the DC and ripple voltages measured after the filter (with a constant RC) change if we change from a half wave to a full wave rectifier? Explain (draw it).

3. How do the DC and ripple voltages change when measured after a filter, if we use a half wave rectifier but two different (RC value) filters? Explain (draw it).

4. List the parameters of measured regulated linear power supply we can read from the load (output) characteristic. Which of two measured voltage power supplies is "better" and why?

5. Why does changing the resistor value from 2.5kΩ to 4.7kΩ in the output voltage divider of a 3-terminal integrated voltage regulator of a voltage power supply influence the change of the output voltage? Explain.

6. Why should voltage about 1.75V to LED be applied in order to get a current of I = 8mA, but in the case of a universal diode only about 0.7V? Explain this phenomenon.

7. Why should be voltage about 0.3V be applied to a Schottky diode in order to get a current of I = 8mA, but in the case of a universal diode about 0.7V? Explain this phenomenon.

8. Explain why the rapid increase of current observed in the Zener diode in a reverse biased condition does not damage it.

Exercise 6

1. Which of the digital techniques is used in a lab exercise? List their parameters. What other digital techniques do you know? List their pros and cons.

2. Why did you use NAND or NOR gates in the lab exercise to build the given logic functions/circuits?

3. What is the 7490 integrated circuit used in the lab exercise?

4. What is the counter and how did you build the counter with a given modulo “n”? Did you use an asynchronous or synchronous counter? Explain.

5. How does one determine the capacity of the counter; how many the flip-flops are needed for a counter with a capacity e.g. equal to 20?

6. What other role can the modulo "n" counter play?

Exercise 7

1. How does the DAC with a weighted resistor network work? What does the output voltage equal?

2. How does an ADC using a successive approximation method work?

3. Explain the DAC results – influence respectively: the sign of reference voltage, the value of the reference voltage (Full Scale Range), and the value of the converted number on the value of absolute and relative error.

4. Explain the ADC results – influence respectively: of the sign of reference voltage, the value of the reference voltage (Full Scale Range), and the value of the converted number on the value of absolute and relative error.

Zakres tematów: (tylko po angielsku)

Laboratory:

1. Training with a using tools such as oscilloscopes, multimeters and signal generators.

2. RC and LR circuits (filters). Frequency and gain response of simple RC circuits ( Low-pass and High-pass filters). Gain of step voltages and square-wave pulses.

3. Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) amplifiers configurations – OE and OC (Emitter Follower). Configurations of amplifiers - characteristics and parameters.

4. Analysis of linear applications with OpAmps – inverting and non-inverting, voltage follower, adder and subtracter. OpAmp RC Active filters. Comparators with hysteresis loop, without hysteresis loop; Circuits with positive feedback - the RC oscillator

5. Power supplies: Basic rectifying circuits - full wave rectifying circuits. Smoothing circuits: π- sections filters. Electronic regulation of power supplies.

DC voltage-current characteristics of diodes: universal / rectifying, the Zener, LED and the Schottky.

6. Digital Logic Elements: designing of selected complex functions using logic gates. Counters - using Flip-flops (binary and BCD counters).

7. Converters DA and AD; Principles of working of selected converters; Estimating parameters,digital and analog errors..

Metody dydaktyczne: (tylko po angielsku)

Practical methods - execution labs on Electronics. Students analyze problems in the field of basic Electronics, to find their solutions, analyze and formulate conclusions; used the theory of the measurement uncertainty to analyze of experiment data.

Grupy zajęciowe

zobacz na planie zajęć

Grupa Termin(y) Prowadzący Miejsca Akcje
1 każdy wtorek, 8:30 - 10:45, sala 2025
Krystyna Perzyńska 1/ szczegóły
Wszystkie zajęcia odbywają się w budynku:
Budynek Wydziału Fizyki - Kampus
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